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Larpcast 34: PVP

This episode is about player versus player combat. Enjoy!

- Mickey and Bill

P.S. There may be a touch more swearing than normal.

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  • Zoe

    “There’s a difference between evil characters and PVP… you can be evil and not PVP.”

    Thank you for this, and I completely agree. I generally don’t like largescale PvP– disagreements are fine; minor hostilities are fine; IG tensions are fine. However, I don’t dig a lot of the vibes that come out of PvP, especially when it’s violent and/or underhanded. It turns into, as you mention, interpersonal problems that go OoG quickly (accusations of cheating especially). I enjoy disagreeing with other PCs, arguing with them, and opposing them. I just don’t like the “let’s screw eachother over” underhanded stuff.

    Accordingly, I don’t really participate in PvP unless it’s facilitated by plot (I like mind control plot, and I’ll roll, happily, with it). When I do engage in PvP, it’s with players I trust– like my husband and best friend– and we have fun with it.)

    All that being said, I love being evil and/or morally grey characters. Even my nicest, goodliest, “I want to make everything right” character has some serious shadiness and a background of kind of evil. It’s interesting to me. My most immoral character flat out doesn’t care about most things, especially humans, and is Apathetic-with-a-capital-A (thanks cool flavor traits!) With that in mind, I don’t need to PvP all over the place. Nor do I want to. To your point, if I were communicating my character’s (im)morality via PvP, it would be obvious, trite, and not very fun.

    Mostly a ramble, but… yes. This.

    Oct 6, 2012 at 12:52 pm
  • Matthew A

    I’ve been thinking a little recently about how rules about resurrection / permanent death might effect the prevalence of PVP in a game.

    In Nero, whether permanent death happens in a particular instance is nondeterministic, but the odds are common knowledge. If a character has died at least two times already, I know with certainty that there is at least a 10% chance they won’t come back if I roll them. Whether or not they successfully resurrect is not at all in the hands of plot. There is a sort of de facto contract that, if you successfully murder someone, they must have a given chance of not coming back.

    In the Accelerant games I know of, the rules that govern when permanent death happens are not known by the players. In fact, in the one that I play, I would not even be sure that murdering someone would raise the odds that they perm during that event at all. There is no such implied contract between plot and the players that they have to let a character perm if they get murdered and then get unlucky.

    The academic nerd in me notes that this might be an example of an ambiguity effect, where people tend to prefer options where the odds of a positive effect are known.

    Oct 7, 2012 at 5:17 am
  • Matthew A

    I’ve been thinking a little recently about how rules about resurrection / permanent death might effect the prevalence of PVP in a game.

    In Nero, whether permanent death happens in a particular instance is nondeterministic, but the odds are common knowledge. If a character has died at least two times already, I know with certainty that there is at least a 10% chance they won’t come back if I roll them. Whether or not they successfully resurrect is not at all in the hands of plot. There is a sort of de facto contract that, if you successfully murder someone, they must have a given chance of not coming back.

    In the Accelerant games I know of, the rules that govern when permanent death happens are not known by the players. In fact, in the one that I play, I would not even be sure that murdering someone would raise the odds that they perm during that event at all. There is no such implied contract between plot and the players that they have to let a character perm if they get murdered and then get unlucky.

    The academic nerd in me notes that this might be an example of an ambiguity effect, where people tend to prefer options where the odds of a positive effect are known.

    Oct 7, 2012 at 5:17 am